As part of a series to mark Equal Pay Day, Moneyish asked some prominent women to share their thoughts and experiences around equal pay. Read more here.

Equal Pay for women is very important. That’s part of what people work for.

When the time and labor of women is devalued and diminished, so are we. Right now, women, on average, earn 20 percent less than men. And when that’s broken down by race, the gap is even worse for African American and Hispanic women, so it’s hard to tease the issue apart from other important issues we need to address. Equal pay was always a given for me in any organization I run including of course my new company Thrive Global. But that’s not enough: creating a workplace culture in which women can thrive is also important.

We need to get rid of this macho notion that burnout and sleep deprivation are proxies for seriousness and dedication to one’s job. Even when they’re working, women are doing the lion’s share of the work of keeping up the household. This becomes a backdoor way of keeping women from advancing. So in addition to compensation, getting more women in leadership positions – both are very important — we need to pay attention to what our day-to-day workplace culture is incentivizing and what it’s punishing. And we need to be careful how we use words. Words like “assertive,” “ambitious,” and “driven” were used against me, but when used to describe men, it was invariably to show their leadership and achievement.

There are many women leaders who really get it and are championing a culture that supports women. One of them is Ellyn Shook, the head of human resources for Accenture’s 400,000 employees, who is incredibly passionate about making diversity and inclusion a priority at Accenture. She’s also focused on the changing landscape of the future of work. That is not only good for women, but good for business too.

Arianna Huffington is the founder of the Huffington Post and founder and CEO of Thrive Global, which has conducted classes for Accenture.