Happiness is a choice.

That’s the message behind the new feel-good wellness company HappyGrace.com, which aims to give stressed-out women the ability to regain control of their lives no matter how busy they are.

CEO and founder Tanya Wheeless, 41, tells Moneyish that she was once one of those stressed moms, working in a high-pressure job as the director of player development for the Phoenix Suns basketball team.

“I was overwhelmed, stressed out trying to be a working mom at high profile positions. I was not happy. It was a breaking point for me,” says Wheeless, who left her development job in 2014, to start her own business coaching execs in time management, stress relief and work-life balance.

Tanya Wheeless, CEO and founder of Happy Grace.

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“If you want to feel better you can hire a coach or go to therapy, but who has the time?” she says.

That’s why she created a print workbook ($38) called Everyday Zen, and free online video and blog forum featuring her signature GLOW method of themes like gratitude, letting go, owning your desires and doing it all with love.

The “Everyday Zen” happiness journal.

The print journal is broken up into a three-month cycle. The book prompts you to write down your monthly intentions of what you hope to accomplish and how you want to feel after. Then there’s a lesson for each day, with themes like power, forgiveness and love; and darker prompts about fear, resentment and anger. After the lesson you’re asked to reflect by filling in the blanks to sentences like,“Today these things went wrong, but it was okay” or “Today, I am grateful for.”

“I wanted to create something for women who were short on time, but ready to take action with the right guidance. I wanted to give them a roadmap that was simple and effective without breaking the bank,” says Wheeless.

Tempe, AZ-based Wheeless is one of many people trying to cash in on the ever-growing market for wellness. The global wellness industry grew by 10.6% to $3.72 trillion between 2013 and 2015, The Global Wellness Institute estimates. That makes it one of the world’s fastest growing markets. Wheeless follows a slew of well-being experts building a self-empowerment empire. Author Gretchen Rubin, who wrote best-selling self help credo “The Happiness Project” detailing her year-long journey to finding a way to live her best life, inspired many to start their own journeys to finding fulfillment. Now she hosts the podcast “Happier,” where she discusses good habits with her sister. And media mogul Arianna Huffington started Thrive Global, a website offering science-based solutions to lower stress and increase productivity with articles like “How to lead a meaningful life in an age of busyness.”

But you likely don’t need to spend a ton to add more gratitude and happiness to your life. First, spend some time writing about things you’re grateful for. Studies show that gratitude reduces a range of toxic emotions from envy and resentment to regret and frustration. And Dr. Robert A. Emmons, a gratitude researcher, discovered a link between giving thanks and well-being, confirming that gratitude can increase happiness and reduce depression.

What’s more, taking time to be thankful for just 15 minutes a day can improve sleep, according to a 2011 study by “Applied Psychology: Health and Well-Being.”

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“We spend decades developing habits and beliefs that separate us from happiness, so we aren’t going to turn that around overnight,” Wheless acknowledges.

“I hope to create daily micro shifts which, over 90 days, leave you feeling happier, less stressed and more balanced overall.”