It’s a prime time to score deals.

Amazon announced today that its third annual Prime Day will be held on Tuesday, July 11th, “with hundreds of thousands of deals exclusively for Prime members around the world” and with “new deals as often as every five minutes.” A Prime membership gives users two-day free shipping on thousands of items, unlimited streaming of many movies and TV shows for $99 a year; you can sign up for one here.

This year, Prime Day will go on for 30 hours, starting at 9 pm ET on Monday, July 10 and going all the way through July 11th. Some of the highlights that consumers can expect include:

  • More Alexa-exclusive deals. This is for members with an Amazon Echo, Echo Dot, Echo Show, Amazon Tap, compatible Fire TV or Fire tablet.
  • Lots of deals on TVs. “Prime Day will include amazing TV deals, with a variety of great brands including the all new Element 4K Ultra HD Smart LED TV – Amazon Fire TV Edition,” the company writes. “Amazon is planning one of its largest total volume TV deals in history with a record level of inventory but once again, the TV deals will likely sell out.”
  • Deals starting now. “Every day leading up to Prime Day on July 11 members will find all kinds of exclusive promotions and deals,” the company writes. These include all of the below deals.
  • Amazon Music Unlimited discount. Prime members who haven’t used Amazon Music Unlimited — which offers users tens of millions of songs — “can get the best deal in Amazon Music history – four months of the full catalog on-demand service with access to tens of millions of songs, for just $0.99,” the company says.
  • $10 to shop on Amazon.com. You get this when you stream a video included in Prime for the first time on your TV.
  • Up to 40% off on a Kindle Unlimited or Audible membership. Kindle Unlimited gives you access to over one million books. Audible is for audiobooks.

While the deals are often good on Prime Day, shoppers must beware not to fall into the “Prime trap.” Amazon Prime members end up spending more than double ($1500 vs. $625) what other Amazon customers spend, according to data from Consumer Intelligence Research Partners.

That’s because, once you’ve paid that membership fee, you’re committed, so you go there first — often without looking elsewhere: “There’s good reason to believe that people who aren’t Prime members are more likely to shop around and make purchases at Amazon only when it’s clearly the most convenient or cheapest option,” an analysis by Time shows. “They don’t automatically defer to making purchases at Amazon, like Prime members appear to do.”