There’s an art to landing a job upon graduation. And it starts with picking the right major.

A fine arts degree is the least valuable degree in America, according to a study released Monday by Bankrate, a financial website, which analyzed unemployment, salary and higher education data for 162 college majors.

Those who take the fine arts path face a 9% unemployment rate (while the unemployment rate nationwide is below 4%, and for college grads in this study below 3%) and average incomes that are below $41,000 (while the average in this study was more than $71,000). That’s the second lowest average annual salary of any of the 162 majors analyzed, and the highest unemployment rate.

“It’s a double whammy in income and unemployment,” says Bankrate.com analyst Adrian Garcia — adding that these general fine arts degree holders may struggle even more than those with specialized fine arts degree holders (like say a specific dance or theater major) because their degree isn’t specialized. And many fine arts majors don’t use their degree in their professional life at all: “They use their soft skills to find other employment,” he adds.

Those who major in clinical psychology and composition and speech aren’t doing much better. While clinical psych majors make more than $51,000 per year, nearly three in four have a higher degree like a master’s or above — an indication that many needed advanced schooling (and possibly took on more student loan debt) to land a job. And composition and speech majors make just above $44,000 a year, with higher than average unemployment.

5 least valuable college majors

Rank Degree Average Income Unemployment Higher Degree Holders
158 Visual and Performing Arts $43,996 4.0% 23%
159 Cosmetology Services and Culinary Arts $42,362 4.7% 8%
160 Clinical Psychology $51,022 4.8% 74%
161 Composition and Speech $44,211 4.9% 26%
162 Miscellaneous Fine Arts $40,855 9.1% 13%

On the flip side, STEM disciplines dominate the most valuable majors, with an actuarial science — which uses math and statistics to measure risk as it relates to insurance and business — degree ranking No. 1. Those grads rake in a salary of more than $108,000 (50% higher than average), face very low unemployment of just 2.3% and fewer than one in four have an advanced degree. That’s followed by zoology, and nuclear engineering.

5 most valuable college majors

Rank Degree Average Income Unemployment Higher Degree Holders
1 Actuarial Science $108,658 2.3% 22%
2 Zoology $111,889 1.4% 68%
3 Nuclear Engineering $108,591 1.8% 48%
4 Health and Medical Preparatory Programs $130,308 2.3% 78%
5 Applied Mathematics $105,679 2.0% 51%

Of course, many will read this and still pursue a degree they adore like fine arts, but experts say it’s important to know what you’re getting into. Consider: If you’re bringing in just $40,000 a year as many fine arts majors do, that might yield you a biweekly paycheck of roughly $1100 or even less; can you afford rent and food and fun on that? Now consider layering on student loan debt: The average monthly student loan payment (for borrower aged 20 to 30 years) is now $351, according to data from StudentLoanHero.com. How much would you even have left over?

“We all just need to be mindful of what we’re getting into and what [a certain degree] might mean for us as we go along our financial journey,” Garcia says. “At the end of the day, the smart thing to do is balance being practical with following your passions.”