It’s been a remarkable year for women.

Glamour announced its coveted Women of the Year list Monday with a lineup of fierce females, particularly in politics, entertainment, fashion and business.

The list honors the 27 key facilitators of the Women’s March on Washington who pulled off the largest protest in modern history the day after the presidential inauguration. The ladies gathered to express rage from Washington, D.C. to Charleston and across the globe from Singapore to Paris. The women’s movement has also campaigned for human rights with marchers standing up against the Muslim travel ban, and in favor of pay equity.

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Earning Glamour’s lifetime achievement award is congresswoman Maxine Waters, who has tirelessly rallied on the front line of progressive politics. The 79-year-old veteran Californian lawmaker called out cabinet officials under investigation for financial ties to Russia. When Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin appeared to be trying to run out her allotted five minutes rather than answering her questions, Waters repeatedly declared that she was “reclaiming my time.” Her powerful words became a hashtag and call to action for all women. The congresswoman has also be praised for her quick witted, punchy social media updates like the time she tweeted: “So Comey told Jeff Sessions he didn’t want to be alone with Trump. Women across the country can relate.”

Then there’s “space ninja” Peggy Whitson, the 57-year-old NASA all-star who flew through the standing record for cumulative time spent in space by a US astronaut. In 2008, Whitson became the first woman to command the space station and in April she became the first lady to command it twice. She surpassed astronaut Jeff Williams’ previous US record of 534 days, 2 hours and 48 minutes of cumulative time in space.

In entertainment, supermodel and activist Gigi Hadid, 22, is honored for using her platform of 36-million Instagram followers to speak out about gun control. Hadid also marched with model sister Bella to protest Trump’s signing of an executive order that suspended immigration to the U.S. from seven Muslim countries. Hadid’s father, Mohamed Hadid, a real estate developer, was born in Palestine, and her mother, Yolanda Hadid, emigrated from Holland.

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“When I started working in fashion, it was like, Gigi, the all-American. I was very much the ‘girl next door,’” she told Glamour, “but if you read my interviews, I always talk about my parents’ cultural backgrounds.”

On another high note, Beyonce’s powerhouse sister Solange Knowles is being celebrated for her politically driven album “A Seat at the Table.” The record takes on important issues like cultural appropriation, racism and the need for activism.

Then there’s “Wonder Woman’s” Patty Jenkins, the first female director of a film that raked in more than $100 million on its opening weekend; and late night comic Samantha Bee, whose “Not the White House Correspondents’ Dinner” event raised nearly $200,000 for the Committee to Protect Journalists. Her “Nasty Woman” T-shirt raised more than $1 million for Planned Parenthood.