Steve Bannon is back in the newsroom.

Hours after his exit from the White House following a turbulent run as President Trump’s chief strategist, Bannon returned to Breitbart, the far-right newsroom he led since 2012 before the POTUS appointed him to run his presidential campaign in 2016.

Bannon returned as executive chairman on Friday, Breitbart confirmed with an article titled: “Populist Hero Stephen K. Bannon Returns Home to Breitbart.”

Bannon expressed excitement about reverting from the West Wing back to his old digs, telling the Weekly Standard in an interview that he felt “jacked up,” and referring to the site as one of his “weapons.”

“Now I’m free. I got my hands back on my weapons. Someone said, ‘it’s Bannon the Barbarian.’ I am definitely going to crush the opposition,” Bannon said.

“And now I’m going to go back, knowing what I know, and we’re about to rev that machine up,” he added, referring to Breitbart.

Bannon joins a slew of other highly paid people to take their old jobs back. Last week, actor Daniel Craig, the 49-year-old actor, who once said he’d rather “break glass and slash my wrists” than play James Bond again, confirmed he will slip right back into the old three-piece-suit for the next action spy movie in 2019.

“I just want to go out on a high note. I can’t wait,” the British actor surprisingly revealed on “The Late Show with Stephen Colbert.”

Former US Weekly news editor Jen Peros, who left the magazine for “Entertainment Tonight” in 2015, is going back to the glossy as a higher up managing editor after new owners, AMI media, brought her back on board, Page Six reported. And after swearing she’d never return to the hyped up drama fest that made her famous on Bravo’s reality show “Real Housewives of New York,” Bethenny Frankel returned to Season 7 in 2015. The Skinny Girl booze mogul was said to be making $250,000 an episode in 2014, and then scored a reported $1 million payday upon her return to the franchise.

For Bannon, taking back the reigns at the news organization should be a smooth transition, considering it’s been pro-Trump since he announced he was running for president. But it’s a lot more difficult for the rest of us to try crawling back to an old boss or job.

“It happens more often than you think,” career coach Maggie Mistal tells Moneyish.

There’s even a name for those who resort back to their old jobs: “boomerang employees.” A recent survey of employers by WorkplaceTrends.com found that 40% rehired about half of the former employees who reapplied for jobs at the company.

Mistal says the minute you realize you hate your new job and truly want your old one back, you must reconnect with HR or an old boss ASAP before the position gets filled.

“The best way to get a raise and promotion at the company you love is to leave and come back,” says Mistal. Going back to your old company after proving yourself at another is actually a great way to negotiate more money and a higher position.

“If they say, ‘Oh, but we paid you this,’ simply say ‘that’s not the market value.’”

And if you left the company trash talking like Craig, odds are you won’t be welcomed back. If you left on a personal sour note, but still proved to be a great worker, you could always try the apology strategy.

“It’s like crawling back to an old boyfriend or spouse,” says Mistal.

“You really need to prove yourself again. You’ve got to own up to it and say, ‘hey, I didn’t’ know what I had until I left. You’re going to need to rebuild the good will.”

But most importantly, don’t settle. Mistal urges that even if you think you hate your new job, you shouldn’t run back to a company where you feel complacent.

“I wouldn’t go back if there were major issues. If your boss wasn’t supportive; if the stress was affecting your health; or for obvious reasons, if you felt harassed or abused,” she says.