Drink to your health.

The many scientific claims that sipping red wine in moderation is good for your heart are pretty common knowledge – not to mention a great excuse to unwind with a glass at night. But research shows there are also some more obscure benefits to support the average person’s drinking habit — good news considering the average bottle recently topped $10 in the U.S., and fine wine-buying Millennials are dropping $4,163 on a year on average.

Here’s five ways that the juice of the grape is surprisingly great for you.

It fights cavities and gum disease. Red wine polyphenols (a.k.a. the healthy antioxidants found in fruits and vino) were found to reduce the ability of the bacteria behind dental plaque, cavities and gum disease to stick to teeth and gums, according to a new American Chemical Society study.

Read also: Drinking coffee makes you live longer – and so does wine, cats, Sriracha and more things that’ll buy you more time

It helps clear your skin. Resveratrol, one of the polyphenols in red wine and dark chocolate, actually fights the growth of acne-causing bacteria longer than go-to pimple product benzol peroxide, which works better in the short-term, according a 2014 study. And it’s really only effective when you sip it, as topical products with the extract have not proven effective. So bottoms up, and bye-bye, blemishes.

It helps you lose weight. Pour off the pounds. Washington State University found that mice fed a high-fat diet gained 40% less weight when they also consumed resveratrol; specifically, the human equivalent of 12 ounces of fruit or wine a day. The wine compound helped convert “white fat” buildup in the body to “beige fat,” which is easier to burn off. And a 2004 German study also found people who drank white wine while on an energy-restricted diet (eating fewer calories than your body needs, forcing it to take energy from stored fat) lost weight while also reaping the other health benefits of wine.

Also read: These 5 low-calorie wines are under 100 calories

It helps you see better. Too much alcohol can lead to blurred vision, but diabetics who drink white wine regularly have a lower risk of eyesight loss due to complications from diabetes, according to the Center for Eye Research at the University of Melbourne. They’re not sure why yet, but those who drank moderate amounts of white or sparkling wines have just a 2.4% risk of this diabetic retinopathy, compared to liquor drinkers having a 49% risk, and red wine drinkers having a 12.2% risk.  Actually, overweight women in particular who sip wine moderately and regularly are less likely to develop Type 2 diabetes than those who don’t drink, as wine has been shown help regulate blood sugar levels.

It boosts short-term memory. A happy hour drink could boost your work performance. Resveratrol has also been linked with better short-term recall, as those who took a resveratrol supplement for six months could remember more words in a lab test than those who took a placebo. Those taking resveratrol also had more connections in the brain areas involved with memory. Just don’t drink so much that you blackout.

In fact, none of these studies greenlight all-you-can-drink boozefests. You can have too much of a good thing, and research has also linked high alcohol consumption with an increased risk of dementia; cancers of the throat, mouth, liver and breast; cirrhosis; stroke; and some heart conditions such as irregular heartbeats and stretched-out heart muscles. You’ll reap the best benefits by sipping your vino in moderation.