They’re not pussyfooting around their experience.

The all-women Russian punk rock band Pussy Riot just launched a Kickstarter campaign in a bid to raise $78,000 to recreate the Russian prison experience in a London art gallery. Two members of the feminist band were famously sentenced to serve in a Russian prison camp after the group staged an anti-Putin performance in a Moscow orthodox church in 2012. Now, they’re teaming up with theater ensemble Les Enfants Terribles on an “immersive theater experience” that commemorates the experience and raises awareness about the Russian penal system.

According to a statement released by Nadya Tolokonnikova, one of the formerly incarcerated members, attendees of the production will get to experience “exactly what Pussy Riot went through during our imprisonment – from the original Church performance, to the court trial and prison cells.” That means recreating everything from solitary confinement cells to a labor gulag and “priests who shout about banning abortions and many more absurd, but real-life things that exist in Russia.”

As of Monday morning, less than 12 hours after the Kickstarter fundraising project was launched, 26 backers had donated almost $2,000. The plan is to splash the cash on theater staff, costumes, lighting and refurbishing the gallery rooms so that they look sufficiently Stalinist. Among the enticements Pussy Riot is offering include conferring “honorary b—ch” status on those who offer up $6 and an alternative tour of Moscow with Tolokonnikova for those who pledge $13,000.

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Pussy Riot’s new project is very much in the Western political zeitgeist: Vladimir Putin has been a permanent fixture in the headlines over the past year after American intelligence agencies concluded that Russia interfered in last year’s U.S. presidential election. “Vladimir Putin is afraid of powerful women who are not afraid to speak up,” Tolokonnikova told The Hollywood Reporter.

Now, she hopes to use that attention to “educate more people about the harsh realities facing Russians today (as well as other prisoners across the world), realities that given the current world political order could potentially spread to the West itself very soon.”

The Kickstarter campaign ends in four weeks.