He was the man with the golden touch.

Sir Roger Moore, who played British secret agent James Bond a record seven times, has died at age 89. The English actor passed away in Switzerland on May 23 after a short bout with cancer, his family said in a statement. “We know our own love and admiration will be magnified many times over, across the world, by people who knew him for his films, his television shows and his passionate work for UNICEF which he considered his greatest achievement,” Moore’s three children said.

Moore was one of only six men to suit up as 007. While he didn’t have mega hits like Sean Connery’s “Thunderball” and Daniel Craig’s “Skyfall,” he was still a pretty lucrative draw. After adjusting for inflation, his run from 1973’s “Live and Let Die” to 1985’s “A View to a Kill” made approximately $1.2 billion at the Box Office, data from Box Office Mojo show. His most commercially successful film was the 1979 space age thriller “Moonraker,” the fifth most lucrative Bond flick of all time.

The Bond film franchise has made more than $5.7 billion since its inception, after taking into account inflation. The highest grossing Bond film was “Thunderball,” which took home over $660 million, the lowest grossing was “License to Kill,” making $77 million.

The campy secret agent that Moore portrayed was very different from the “blunt instrument” that author Ian Fleming envisioned when he first penned “Casino Royale.” Moore often faced criticism that he wasn’t as suave as Connery, something he would later say he understood. “When I played the part he looked and sounded like me. That’s where the similarities and differences begin and end,” he said in a 2015 interview. When asked to rank himself alongside Timothy Dalton, Pierce Brosnan and co., he said that he was only the fourth best actor to have possessed a license to kill.

Roger George Moore was born in London on 14 October 1927. He was conscripted into the British military before working as a model and actor. He leaves behind his fourth wife and three children.