Roseanne Barr’s apology tour is underway.

The disgraced sitcom star said her inflammatory tweets, including a racist post about former Obama adviser Valerie Jarrett, have made her a “hate magnet” in an emotional podcast interview released Saturday.

Barr, whose eponymous reboot of 90’s show “Roseanne” was canceled by ABC on May 29, hours after the now-deleted tweet went viral, said her decision to post the racist comment comparing Jarrett, who is African American, to an ape was an “embarrassing mistake.”

“I apologize to anyone who thought or felt offended, and who thought that I meant something that I, in fact, did not mean,” Barr told her friend, Rabbi Shmuley Boteach, in her first interview since the incident. “It was my own ignorance, and there’s no excuse for that ignorance.”

“I’m a lot of things, a loud mouth and all that stuff,” Barr continued between sobs. “But I’m not stupid, for God’s sake. I never would have wittingly called any black person and say they are a monkey. I just wouldn’t do that. I didn’t do that. And people think that I did that, and it just kills me. I’m just so sorry that I was so unclear and stupid.”

The actress added that she took an Ambien sleeping pill that night, but maintated her actions were inexcusable.

“I don’t excuse it. I horribly regret it. Are you kidding?” Barr said. “I lost everything, and I regretted it before I lost everything. And I said to God, ‘I am willing to accept whatever consequences this brings, because I know I’ve done wrong. I’m willing to accept what the consequences are,’ and I do, and I have. But they don’t ever stop. They don’t accept my apology or explanation. And I’ve made myself a hate magnet.”

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ABC and the production company behind the recent reboot of “Roseanne” announced last week that they are moving ahead with a spinoff of the hit show, which was canceled last month. The new spinoff, “The Connors,” — a surname of the featured family — will air this fall, bringing jobs back to the entire cast except Barr, a former executive producer on the reboot, who will have no creative or financial involvement in the revamped version.

SEE ALSO: This is what a single tweet cost Roseanne Barr — and everyone who worked with her

“I regret the circumstances that have caused me to be removed from ‘Roseanne,’” Barr said in a statement picked up by the Hollywood Reporter last week, adding that she’s grateful her former colleagues got to keep their jobs. “I agreed to the settlement in order that 200 jobs of beloved cast and crew could be saved, and I wish the best for everyone involved.”

SEE ALSO: How to take the high road, like John Goodman with his ‘Roseanne’ response

Barr and Goodman were each taking home a reported $250,000 per episode — that’s $2.25 million each for the first season. And ABC’s move to cancel the show cost the network a ton in potential ad revenue: The revival, which made $45 million in ad dollars this past season, was slated to earn up to $60 million in its 11th season, per Kantar Media figures provided to The Wrap.

It’s unclear if “The Connors” will address Barr’s disappearance. ABC has described the synopsis for the spinoff so far as, “After a sudden turn of events, the Conners are forced to face the daily struggles of life in Lanford in a way they never have before.”