2018 has been branded the year of the woman — and millennial women could play a pivotal role.

Millennial women aged 18 to 34 care most about education (19%), jobs and the economy (17%), the environment (15%) and immigration and race issues (both 11%), according to a joint survey by Vanity Fair’s the Hive, theSkimm and SurveyMonkey to better understand the millennial woman’s beliefs and behaviors ahead of this year’s midterms.

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Six in 10 millennial women strongly disapprove of President Trump’s job performance; another 18% somewhat disapprove. Twenty-eight percent believe things have gotten worse for women since a year ago, while 44% think they’ve remained roughly the same. More than half (52%) said Trump’s election had made them more likely to vote in future elections, and 20% said it had made them more likely to consider running for office.

They also appear to have an activist streak: 36% said they were more involved in politics or causes in their community than they were last year, with 52% of millennial women lining up behind Black Lives Matter, 50% behind LGBTQ issues and 48% behind feminism. Forty-three percent supported the #MeToo movement, launched amid a flurry of sexual misconduct allegations against powerful men, and 25% supported the Time’s Up gender equality initiative.

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As for engagement with this year’s Women’s March, 12% attended or marched in person, 23% posted opinions on social media and 3% volunteered to help with voter registration. Asked about the extent to which the Women’s Marches — both post-inaugural and in 2018 — had improved women’s standing in the U.S., 43% said “some” and 10% said “a lot.”

Whether these views translate to action, however, is anyone’s guess: 46% of millennial women said they were absolutely certain to vote in the 2018 midterms, compared to 64% of Americans overall, and 52% said they’d voted in the 2016 presidential election — more than 20% less than Americans overall. Just 67% of millennial women said they were registered to vote at their current address, the survey found, versus 82% of all Americans.