Rashida Jones’ latest role is directing an animated #TimesUp public service announcement.

The “Parks and Recreation” star, who has been a voice for the #TimesUp movement since its inception in January, volunteered to direct a PSA about sexual harassment in the workplace narrated by Donald Glover (aka rapper Childish Gambino).

“It’s been a tough conversation to include men in, because I think there are a lot of things women feel men have not understood up until now, and they don’t feel like it’s their job to educate them,” Jones told Buzzfeed News.

Jones wrote the script and teamed up with Blue Seat Studios — known for its viral 2015 “Tea Consent” video, which explained sexual consent in the form of offering someone a cup of tea — to animate the new PSA, which tackles the issues of verbal and physical harassment at work, and how to respond if you’re a victim or a bystander.

“Has the current wave of sexual allegations left you scared, confused, maybe even a little angry? Is the culture shifting under your feet so fast you can’t make sense of it? Or do you simply not know how to behave at work anymore?” Glover narrates in the beginning of the clip as an “FAQ About Sexual Harassment” book appears on screen.

Cartoon stick figures then act out hypothetical situations and questions like, “Is it okay to greet your co-worker with a deep, full body hug or a mouth kiss?”

“No,” Glover says. “This is what we call unwelcome touching.”

Next, he asks, “Is it okay to think a co-worker looks sexy in their pants? Sure thing. But is it okay to tell that person that you think they look sexy? No.”

The PSA then tackles “confusing” scenarios in the workplace, such as whether it’s okay to ask someone out at work. This can be a gray area considering 41% of coworkers told CareerBuilder they have had a romantic relationship at work. Glover explains it may be OK, but to consider the following questions first; “What kind of power dynamic exists? Are you their boss? Do you have a more secure job? Is there a possibility that this person might fear getting fired if they say no or report you? Is it possible the vibe you think you’re picking up on is just them trying to be nice? If the answer is ‘yes’ to any of these questions, just don’t do it.”

The video then dives into what to do if you witness a colleague getting sexually harassed, verbally or physically, in the workplace. “Yeah it’s you’re problem,” Glover asserts adding: “It’s like a Ouija board, If you’re not pushing and pulling, then the people who are pushing and pulling get to make the rules.”

Jones said choosing a male narrator was vital to the initiative to show people that men are an important part of this conversation, and can be allies for women.

“I really respect [Glover’s] ability to be a part of and criticize culture at the same time,” Jones, who has known him for years, told BuzzFeed. “I think it’s a really hard balance to strike … he’s able to be true to himself and be honest … but also to say something and have people listen.”

Jones said the PSA was not targeted at one specific industry or gender and is meant to serve as a broad conversation starter for all workplaces to address a no-tolerance policy for sexual harassment.

SEE ALSO: The women behind this viral new sexual harassment PSA tell Moneyish why they drew from those choking posters

Jones’ PSA is the latest to take on sexual harassment at work. Last month, two women in the restaurant industry put out a free poster inspired by the “Choking Victim” illustrations that instructs service industry workers on what to do if they ever feel unsafe on the job.