For Cindy Whitehead, there’s one final (pink) glass ceiling to shatter.

In 2015, the entrepreneur sold Sprout Pharmaceuticals, the company she had co-founded, for a cool $1 billion. Whitehead was already wealthy from the previous sale of another pharmaceutical firm she’d operated, but her exit from Sprout also made her famous. It was the developer of Addyi, a sexual arousal drug that was promptly dubbed “female viagra.” And Whitehead, perpetually clad in trademark hot pink, was its public face.

Her next act: nurturing other female business successes. A year ago, Whitehead founded the Pink Ceiling, a startup incubator and consultancy that grows businesses either run by women, or that focus on common health problems faced by females. An early investment was in a producer of nail polish that promised to detect a date rape drug. Since then, Whitehead has spread about $15 million of her Sprout proceeds into 10 other early-stage businesses, including a creator of a biometric sensor that helps detect potential injuries and a startup that uses heat-mapping technology to identify ideal spots for lumbar punctures.

Her mission is essentially a feminist one. “I need to see that she can be more successful than a woman who runs a cupcake shop,” Whitehead tells Moneyish of the sort of startup founder she invests in. “Our tagline is making women f—king rich. There’s a conversation about women having a voice, but I don’t know any woman who doesn’t have a voice. What they need is power, and money is power.”

Cindy Whitehead (The Pink Ceiling)

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Born to a State Department employee father and raised in D.C. and abroad, Whitehead studied business at Marymount University in Virginia before working in pharmaceutical sales and eventually striking out of her own. But in the male-dominated drug business, she didn’t have many women to look up to. “In their absence, you have to hone your curiosity. There was a lot of reverse mentorship in taking advice and experience from everyone I was surrounded by,” Whitehead says.

Fledgling businesses at the Raleigh, N.C.-based Pinkubator get access to hot pink lockers and rosé on tap, and are mentored by Whitehead and a team that has worked with her across two businesses. (She likes the  color because it helps her stand out in the dull men’s fashion staples of blue and grey.) The rosy backdrop also hosts tough talk about what it takes to succeed. “I love that many young women grew up in a ‘Shark Tank’ world that made business leaders heroes, but I don’t want there to be an absence of candor,” she says, adding that she often sees promising entrepreneurs with bad ideas. “If they start their own business with the wrong idea, we reinforce the narrative that women just don’t have what it takes.”

And having women guide other women is easier. “There are good guys who want to help female founders, but struggle between encouragement and wanting to be direct,” she says. “The conversation woman-to-woman is different. We’re uniquely suited to give other women candid feedback.”

The relationship isn’t one-sided: Whitehead often draws inspiration from the women she works with. At Sprout, she faced a major setback after the Food and Drug Administration initially refused to grant permission to bring Addyi to market, meaning that she had to raise millions more for further trials. A major pick-me-up came when she received an email from a test patient who urged her to keep going.  “She had succeeded in every aspect other than” having good sex, Whitehead says. “I saw she had started to internalize that she was the one to blame and started choking up. I’m advocating for women like her and other female founders.”

Here we go! Pajama Party rolling in the #pinkubator 🙌#pinkbosses in the making #thefutureispink

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(Whitehead eventually got the FDA to approve Addyi, albeit for heavily restricted use. Sales of the drug at Valeant, the troubled pharmaceutical giant that bought Addyi, have been lackluster. Whitehead is now working with a group of former Sprout shareholders who this month reached an agreement with Valeant to take back ownership of Addyi.)

Whitehead is well aware of statistics that show female founders received less than $1.5 billion in venture capital funding in 2016, compared to the $58.2 billion companies with all-male founders brought in. But that is starting to change. That’s partly because some men in power, she says, have learnt to fight the “human nature not to invest in things unfamiliar to you.”

But the bottom line, she says, lies in empirical evidence. “In society, we chalk up women’s desires and thoughts to psychology, not scientific evidence.  But if you see a woman on a company’s board, there are higher returns. That is so blatantly obvious. If I have data, I can’t imagine how I’d ignore that.”