Call it Tweetbook.

Twitter announced it would double the 140 character limit on tweets Tuesday, and many users are responding with just two: “No.”

The social media site is testing out upping the tweet limit on timeline feeds to 280-character tweets, allowing a random sample of users to try it in an effort to help people be more vocal.

“Our research shows us that the character limit is a major cause of frustration for people tweeting in English,” the company said in a blog post.

“When people don’t have to cram their thoughts into 140 characters and actually have some to spare, we see more people Tweeting — which is awesome.”

But many users are perfectly fine with sharing just a few words, and fear that having more freedom of expression could lead to unwanted political rants, lengthy posts clogging up feeds like on Facebook and other unwanted TMI. 

“I truly believe the 280 character limit will be the death of Twitter,” “Silicon Valley” star, Kumail Nanjiani, tweeted.

Politically speaking, Twitter did not mention if President Trump will get access to the longer tweets, but there are other notable people who are ecstatic about the excess word roll out.  Ellen DeGeneres is already experimenting with it.

“Let me just say it’s an honor and a privilege,” the talk show host tweeted.

Twitter’s brand has always been about brief messages updated in real-time. The 140-character limit was initially put into place to be on par with the length of a SMS message, which is now limited to 160 characters. Last year, Twitter ran internal tests for longer tweets and considering the limit as much as 10,000 characters.

The higher character limit was inspired by people using Twitter in other languages like Chinese, Japanese and Korean, which all use characters that sometimes express more than regular characters can. So technically, users who speak those languages already have a higher limit.

The super-sized tweets seem to be getting some traction. Shares of Twitter rose more than 1% in extended trading following the news, after declining more than 2% during the regular session.